ABOUT

bio-photo-chanEric W. Chan will begin his journey as a professional scholar at Babson College, where he will hold the appointment of Assistant Professor of Statistics and Public Policy in Fall 2018. Recently, he defended his dissertation as the final part of his Ph.D. in Economics & Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. During his time at Columbia, he studied to apply microeconomic theory and quantitative methods to answer research relevant questions in education policy. His current broad research interests are in randomized experiments, family engagement, specialized populations, labor market choices, low-income housing, and issues in immigration policy. In 2016, he won the Columbia Committee on the Economics of Education (CCEE) Prize for best research paper by a PhD student in the field of Economics of Education. In addition to his studies, he has also taught courses in quantitative methods at Babson College and applied economics and quantitative courses at Columbia University.

When he is not spending his time on his research, he spends time reading his Bible, learning to be a good husband, writing fiction, and playing his guitar. Originally from Boston, his interest in solving educational problems stems from the time he spent as an inner city student and his time after college working for the Boston Public School system as an Education Pioneers Analyst Fellow. He has a B.S. from Babson College and an M.A. from Teachers College, and previously worked for PricewaterhouseCoopers and the Boston Public Schools.

Eric may be reached at echan1@babson.edu or @ericwchan.

 

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